The Indian

Today’s tune is a another French-Canadian tune called The Indian. What makes this tune so fun to play is that it begins in the key of G, and then switches to the key of C for the B part. On the surface, it looks fairly easy, but I found out real quick that it takes some work to play it up to speed. We have an accordion player in our group who, when this tune is called, really cranks it up tempo. That makes it fun, but definitely more challenging.:) THe melody does follow the chord structure a good part of the time, so that’s a little hint on how to place your fingers, as well as utilizing the open strings.

Here is the guitar TAB and notation – Indian, The – Gtr TAB

I could not find any video so that you could hear it played….

As always, put down the remote, the device, the cell, and pick up your guitar. You’ll be glad that you did!!

Blessings

Reel de Beatrice

The tune of the day is

REEL de BEATRICE

This wonderful French-Canadian tune is super enjoyable to play, either as the melody or accompaniment. It is in the key of Am, and has three equal parts, meaning that the parts are all the number of measures long, in this case, 8 measures each. I was introduced to Reed de Beatrice by a hammered dulcimer player friend of mine. It’s a challenge to play, but gives quite a sense of accomplishment when you learn it.:)

Flatpicking this tune came up in conversation when a fiddle player in our jam group, who also is a guitarist, played it. I heard him from in the shadows, and I went home and learned it, at least at slow speed. Haha. I ran across him recently and he asked me about my flatpicking, and when I told him that I work on my guitar almost daily, he suggested a future guitar jam, and mentioned Reed de Beatrice. Welp, that’s all I needed to get it out again!

As with most tunes, it’s easier to flatpick them if you memorize them. This one, in particular, seems a must to memorize. I am having you travel up the neck a bit in all three parts, but it’s not difficult once you get the hang of the tune. My biggest suggestion for this piece would be a slow and steady tempo. With three parts, it will be tempting to speed along on the parts that are easier, then slow way down for the more difficult passages. Trust me on this one. A steady tempo played slower makes a much bigger impression and sets the stage for some nice playing as you gain speed. Use your METRONOME. It’s not a bad thing.:)

OK, here’s the guitar TAB and notation – Reel de Beatrice – Gtr TAB  Notice that it’s a 2-pager.

It’s such a mild spring day here in the Midwest. I hope the weather is great where you are, too. So, get out your metronome for this one, and try this great tune out!

Blessings

Falls of Richmond

Today our tune is

FALLS  OF  RICHMOND

This tune is really a cool tune to learn and play! It’s in the key of Am, and is a three-parter. It also goes back to the B part after playing only one C part, so the format is AABBCBB. I had trouble finding anything about the tune until I looked it up as Richmond Falls – bingo! There IS the Falls of Richmond. “At Richmond in Swaledale the River Swale cascades down a series of rocky steps which are known as Richmond Falls.” The River Swale is located in the Yorkshire Dales in Northern England, which you can read more about here. Next, here is a YouTube video showing folks canoeing the falls.

OK, here is the guitar TAB and notation – Falls of Richmond – Gtr TAB

And…….here is a wonderful video of The Falls of Richmond being played in situ, meaning in its original, natural place. How awesome it that??!!

It’s a mild day here in the Midwest with rain in the forecast, making it a great opportunity to just sit down for a bit and play a tune. Go ahead, do it! You’ll be glad that you did.:)

Blessings

Big Liza Jane

The tune of the day is

BIG  LIZA  JANE

There are so many Liza Jane tunes, and this is just one that seems to be pretty common.:) In my files, I also have Liza Jane, Little Liza Jane, Goodbye Liza Jane, and Hurry Up, Liza Jane. I’m certain that’s not all of them!

This is one of those “never-ending” tunes, as the end of the B part stair steps down from the A chord back to the D chord at the beginning. If you must finally end the tune, just resolve it on the D chord after the least measure.

Here is the guitar TAB and notation – Big Liza Jane – Gtr TAB

I though that I’d feature an actual flatpick version of Big Liza Jane. Hope that you enjoy it!

This is a really cool tune to learn, so put aside your cares for a bit, and work on something to cheer your heart. You’ll be glad that you did.

 

 

My Love is in America

The tune of the day is

MY  LOVE  IS  IN  AMERICA

There are actually two pieces of music with this same title, but one is a fiddle tune and the other is a ballad type of song. My Love is in America is a common session tune that is interestingly modal, but not. It uses a C natural in the A part, and switches to a C# in places in the B part. Either way, it has a really cool sound, and it’s not hard to play at all.:)

Here is the guitar TAB and notation – My Love is in America – Gtr TAB

I found My Love in in America paired here with Cooley’s Reel. I think I like it!

Now you know what I’m going to say……instead of sitting longer at the computer, log off, get your guitar out, and work on this great tune. You’ll be so glad that you did!

Blessings

Apples in June?

The tune of the day is

JUNE  APPLE

This is one of those A modal tunes, so the normal G# is played as a G natural. In my research, I discovered, much to my surprise, that there are two versions of June Apple. They are similar but distinct enough that I’m not sure they’d go well played simultaneously at a jam. So, one is what is probably labeled the Old-Time version, and the other one, featured here, is maybe a bluegrass version? This is the tune that we play locally. I must say, however, that I really enjoy the “new” OT version as well!

Hopefully that wasn’t too confusing….here is the tab and notation – June Apple – Gtr TAB

Oh, yes, since I didn’t know what June Apples were, I looked around and found some interesting information here – http://marycrimmins.com/june-apples/

The video demonstrating the tune features a fiddle and banjo, and although they have titled it as an old-time fiddle tune, they are playing the “bluegrass” version that I’ve posted here.

As always, get out your guitar and try it out!

Blessings

 

Old Joe Clark

Today’s tune is

OLD  JOE  CLARK

This tune is another one of those “standard” jam tunes. It is easy to learn and play, and lots of people know it if you call it. I found it mostly in the key of A, but our dulcimer group played it in the key of D, and some play it in G. I have notated it here in the key of A.

In researching this tune, I found this information at http://www.balladofamerica.com/music/indexes/songs/oldjoeclark/

“Old Joe Clark is an American fiddle tune that is well-known throughout the United States and other parts of the world. Many different verses and choruses have been sung to the tune. The song’s origins are unclear, as is the identity of Joe Clark himself, if the title did actually derive from a namesake. Various claims indicate that Joe Clark may have been a moonshiner in the Virginia hills, a veteran of the War of 1812, or a banjo player from Clay County, Kentucky.”

So, here is the guitar TAB and notation – Old Joe Clark – Gtr TAB

Since I really enjoy the banjo, I chose a YouTube video of Old Joe Clark being played in not one but two banjos!

The days are getting warmer here as winter is drawing to a close, and it’s the perfect time to get out your guitar for bit, and work on this old-time tune. You’ll be glad that you did!

Blessings

 

Greencastle Hornpipe

The tune of the day is

GREENCASTLE HORNPIPE

I learned this tune on the mandolin from a fiddler friend, and it seems like just the tune for the guitar as well. I found it in two main keys – a Norman Blake version played in the key of D, and a “traditional” version played in G, so I included notation and TAB for both keys. The fingering for the D version is much easier on the guitar, so you could put your capo on the 5th fret in order to play it in G with someone else. BUT, the fingering for the key of G (without using your capo) is a bit more challenging because it’s played up the neck at the 7th and 8th frets in the B part, so you might feel like expanding your horizons and working up higher than usual. Whichever works best for you, at the skill level that you are, is what is best for you.:) The goal is to play the tune and have fun doing it!

Here is the guitar  TAB and notation –

Greencastle Horpipe (D) – Gtr TAB

Greencastle Hornpipe (G) – Gtr TAB

Here is the tune played in the key of D on the mandola. I chose this because the mandola has a nice sound and the playing is simple and well-done.

The temps outside are getting warmer here in the Midwest, so it just seems perfect to get out your guitar and work on this peppy little hornpipe. You’ll be so glad that you did.:)

Blessings

 

Who’s In the Kitchen?

Today’s tune is

ANGELINE  THE  BAKER

This old standby tune is in the key of D and, with lots of quarter notes, is very achievable for even the beginner. There are many, many versions of the tune, but mostly one basic melody to start out with. Hooray! The chord structure is mostly D with a G thrown in every now and then.

Here is the guitar TAB and notation – Angeline the Baker

The video of Angeline the Baker that I found was done by The Wayfarers, and they play it with lots of energy and enthusiasm. And, as an aside, they pair it with Sal’s Got Mud Between Her Toes, which I absolutely love! That tune has been covered on this blog, and you can find the notation and TAB for Sal’s here – Sal’s Got Mud Between Her Toes – Gtr TAB.

You can’t miss by learning Angeline the Baker, so grab your guitar and give it a whirl! You’ll be glad that you did!

Blessings

Arkansas Traveler

The tune of the day is

ARKANSAS  TRAVELER

This is one of those old standards, but it’s on the more difficult side because of the B part. I tried to keep the melody very basic. Arkansas Traveler is flatpicked a lot, and there are many complex versions available, online or in books, after you have mastered the tune.

And yes, most of you will be singing the Baby Bumblebee song as you play the A part!

Here is the guitar TAB and notation – Arkansas Traveler – Gtr TAB

There were SO MANY videos on YouTube that it was hard for me to chose one. I finally chose this one due to the fact that it wasn’t played at lightning speed so that you can hear all of the notes in order to learn the tune. 🙂

As always, put down those electronic devices, the TV remote, or even that good book, and carve out a few minutes to work on your guitar. You’ll be glad that you did!

Blessings